Easter (2013) – Passover (5773) …item 2.. ORTHODOX UNION – Lamb Shashlik (Feb 28th, 2013) …item 3.. Tips for an Allergy-Friendly Passover (Mar 6th, 2013) …

Easter (2013) – Passover (5773)  …item 2.. ORTHODOX UNION – Lamb Shashlik (Feb 28th, 2013) …item 3.. Tips for an Allergy-Friendly Passover (Mar 6th, 2013) …

Some cool Hot Chicken Recipe images:

Easter (2013) – Passover (5773) …item 2.. ORTHODOX UNION – Lamb Shashlik (Feb 28th, 2013) …item 3.. Tips for an Allergy-Friendly Passover (Mar 6th, 2013) …
Hot Chicken Recipe

Image by marsmet547
Easter and Passover are on their way, and that means family will be getting together to celebrate the holidays. Whether your family has a tried and true menu, or likes to change it up year after year, having the right wine on the table makes everything better. Recently, I brought four wines to the CBS12 WPEC station as recommendations for your holiday celebrations.

The segment starts with two kosher for Passover wines. There is not a tremendous difference between kosher wine and non kosher wine. In general, because kosher wine is used in the Sabbath blessing, as well as holidays, it can only be handled by Sabbath observant Jews. Additionally, no animal products can be used in the winemaking process, such as gelatin or egg whites to fine the wine (remove particulates).

The difference in Kosher for Passover versus Kosher wine is that they make sure no grain yeasts are used, since during Passover Jews do not eat any grains (no bread, for example). That’s it, otherwise, it’s fermented grape juice, just like any other wine. I’ve discussed kosher Chardonnay previously, and compared to a non-kosher chardonnay.
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…..item 1)…. Pairing wine with Easter and Passover meals …

A Good Time with Wine … agoodtimewithwine.com

… Making Wine Approachable …

Written on APRIL 8, 2011 by MATT.MMWINE

agoodtimewithwine.com/2011/04/08/pairing-wine-with-easter…

Easter and Passover are on their way, and that means family will be getting together to celebrate the holidays. Whether your family has a tried and true menu, or likes to change it up year after year, having the right wine on the table makes everything better. Recently, I brought four wines to the CBS12 WPEC station as recommendations for your holiday celebrations.

The segment starts with two kosher for Passover wines. There is not a tremendous difference between kosher wine and non kosher wine. In general, because kosher wine is used in the Sabbath blessing, as well as holidays, it can only be handled by Sabbath observant Jews. Additionally, no animal products can be used in the winemaking process, such as gelatin or egg whites to fine the wine (remove particulates).
The difference in Kosher for Passover versus Kosher wine is that they make sure no grain yeasts are used, since during Passover Jews do not eat any grains (no bread, for example). That’s it, otherwise, it’s fermented grape juice, just like any other wine. I’ve discussed kosher Chardonnay previously, and compared to a non-kosher chardonnay.

The first wine in the TV segment above was Hagafen 2008 Chardonnay from the Oak Knoll District of Napa, California. This wine retails for , and is a nice Napa Valley chardonnay at this price. Irit and Ernie Weir founded the winery in 1979 with their inaugural vintage in 1980. With a total production of only 8,000 cases annually, they produce small batches of various wines including merlot, cabernet sauvignon, zinfandel, chardonnay, and riesling. Their wines are well made, and for this segment I tasted the merlot, cabernet and chardonnay. I selected the chardonnay as I thought it offered a nice rich and full mouth feel, having good pear fruit with the toasty spice from the oak aging. This wine sees malolactic fermentation, which gives it that rich mouth feel, often associated with a buttery quality, and a little oak which gives it the buttery taste, as well as a little spice. This wine will pair well with the appetizers, as well as any lighter fare served at the Seder such as chicken. For the record, the name is pronounced Ha-Ga-Fen, not Hag-a-fen as I said in the above TV spot. Clearly, my Hebrew needs as much work as my French and Italian. In the Hebrew prayer over grape juice or grape wine, the ending words “p’ri hagafen” translates to Fruit of the Vine.

For a red wine option, I selected the Baron Herzog 2007 Cabernet Sauvignon from Central Coast, California. The Herzog family has a long history of wine making, dating back to Philip Herzog making wine for the Austro-Hungary court more than 100 years ago. Emperor Franz Josef enjoyed the wines so much, he made Philip a Baron! During World War II, Philips grandson Eugene hid the family from the Nazis by moving them around the Slovenian countryside, and at the end of the war came out from a false wall in a friends shed to reclaim his family’s winery. Three years later they were driven from their home, and in 1948 arrived in New York. Eugene toiled in a small store front making kosher wine from Concord grapes, and instead of being paid for some of his work, was given shares in the company. All of the other owners eventually gave up their shares, and in 1958 he became the sole shareholder. They renamed the company Royal Wines in deference to grandfather Philip, and turned the company into a success. They moved out to California, expanding in 1985, with a focus on making high end quality wine under two labels, Baron Herzog and Herzog Wine cellars.

The Baron Herzog 2007 Cabernet Sauvignon is made mostly from grapes sourced from the Paso Robles wine region. It’s aged 18 months in stainless steel, which helps retain the fruit notes. The nose of the wine has bright raspberry and red fruits, which soften as it opens up. This is a very California wine, showing more fruit than earthy or leathery notes. While a tad dry and mild tannins, the round fresh fruit translates from the nose to the palate. It will pair nicely with your Passover Seder meal, whether that includes brisket, lamb shank, or some other roasted dish. For , it’s a nice California Cabernet, Kosher for Passover or not.

There were plenty of other Kosher for Passover wines I could have selected. I tasted the Ben Ami Chardonnay and Merlot, and while both were a bit on the lighter and easy drinking side, they’d make a fine showing at your Passover dinner. I also tried the Hagafen Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, which showed a bit more earthy and leather notes on the palate than the Baron Herzog. Any would make a fine showing at your meal. While selecting a Kosher for Passover wine requires a little work, visiting Total Wine will help make that work a bit easier. They’ve got a tremendous selection of Kosher wines, including other US made wines as well as Israel made wines. They’ve also plenty of wines to select for Easter. Selecting a wine for Easter isn’t as restrictive as Passover, so the field is wide open. For Easter, I selected two Argentinian wines for the TV segment, and think for the price, they offer great quality, though they aren’t Kosher for Passover.

With about 1,500 acres of vineyards 5,500 feet above sea level, the Michel Torino Estate is a key player in the Cafayate Valley of Argentina. The winery was founded in 1892 by brothers Salvador and David Michel, and they produce a wide variety of wines from a malbec rose to cabernet sauvignion to pinot noir and more. In the TV segment, select the Don David Torrontes Reserve 2009 as a great white wine for Easter, and for , it’s great any time. The nose of this wine is absolutely beautiful, with soft white flowers and a slight melon note. The palate shows some citrus and melon, and is light and quite delicious. It will pair well with chicken, sea food and shellfish, and as I mention in the segment, Thai food.

As a red wine for Easter, I believe the Don David Mabec Reseve 2008 will be a fantastic wine selection. Malbec is a versatile wine, and it pairs well with beef or lamb prepared almost any way, as well as ham, which covers most of the meats at traditional Easter meals. Without any decanting this wine has a palate of simple red fruit, with restrained earthy notes. As it opens, the palate is powerful fruit of red cherries and a little chocolate, and shows definitely a bit more new world with it’s round flavor profile. The more this wine opens, the more dark the fruit gets, and the more complexities come out. With a price of about , it’s not only worth making an appearance on your Easter table, it may be the best value wine you can get for the holiday!

Of course, everyone is looking for the best wine for Easter, and Passover, and I’ve given just a few selections here. I’ll come back in a few days to offer some more Easter wine pairings, but I’d love to hear what you plan on serving this holiday season. Easter or Passover, what’s in your glass?

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…..item 2)…. For Everyone Who’s Tired of Potatoes in Passover Dishes …

… ORTHODOX UNION … www.ou.org/life/food/recipes … Enhancing Jewish Life …

By Aviva Kanoff | Feb 28th, 2013 |

www.ou.org/life/food/recipes/everyone-whos-tired-potatoes…

— Lamb Shashlik
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img code photo … Lamb Shashlik

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Ingredients:

… 1 lb. lamb trimmed of all fat, and cut into
… 2-inch cubes (leg or shoulder of lamb)
… ½ cup lemon juice
… ¼ cup garlic, chopped
… ½ cup olive oil
… 1 tsp. black pepper
… 1 tsp. salt
… 1 tbsp. rosemary
… 2 medium onions, cut into eighths
… 2 large peppers (of assorted colors),

cut into 1-inch chunks

Directions:

1.. In a bowl, combine lamb, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, pepper, salt, and rosemary.
Marinate for at least 2-3 hours prior to cooking.

2. Place marinated beef on skewers (about 6 cubes per skewer).

3. Be sure to apply a light coat of oil on the skewer prior to threading the meat.

4. Place onion and pepper on separate skewers, alternating type of vegetable.

5. Cook lamb shashlik skewers on grill or under broiler for 10-12 minutes, or until desired doneness. Turn to ensure even cooking.

6. Grill vegetable skewers for last 5 minutes of grilling. Turn. The vegetables should be crisp, yet tender. Be careful not to overcook.

Note: The meat and veggies are cooked on different skewers because the meat will take longer to grill.
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— Blueberry Crumble
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img code photo … Blueberry Crumble

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Ingredients:

Blueberry Filling:

… 4 cups fresh blueberries
… ¼ cup white sugar
(do not add sugar if blueberries
are naturally very sweet)
… juice of 1 lemon

Crust and Crumb Topping:

… ¾ cup white sugar
… ¼ cup brown sugar
… 1 tsp. baking powder
… 2 cups ground almonds
… 2 cups matzo cake meal
… ¼ tsp. salt
… zest of 1 lemon
… ¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter or
margarine, cold and cut into cubes
… 1 egg
… ¼ cup toasted slivered almonds

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375° and grease a 9×13-inch baking pan.

2. In a mixing bowl combine the blueberry filling ingredients. Stir until mixed well and set aside.

3. In a separate bowl, mix together the white sugar, brown sugar, baking powder, ground almonds, cake meal, salt, and lemon zest until well combined. Add the butter and egg, and use a pastry cutter to blend the ingredients until well combined and you still have pea-sized chunks of butter. Mix in the slivered almonds.

4. Place half of the crust mixture into the baking dish and press it firmly into the bottom. Spoon the blueberry mixture into crust, being careful not to add too much of the liquid.

5. Crumble the rest of the crust mixture over the blueberries so that it is evenly distributed. Bake for 50 minutes until the crumb topping is golden brown.

6. Let cool for at least an hour before cutting. Cut into 24 squares. This dish is best served just slightly above room temperature, but any leftovers can be stored in the refrigerator.
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— Salt & Pepper Kugel
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img code photo … Salt & Pepper Kugel

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Ingredients:

… 3 cups spaghetti squash, shredded
… 3 large eggs
… 1 tsp. salt
… 1 tsp. pepper
… 2 tsp. sugar
… ¼ cup matzo meal
… ¼ cup canola oil

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. Mix all ingredients except for the oil.

3. Pour oil into a 9×12-inch pan, and place in preheated oven for 5 minutes.

4. Pour squash mixture into hot oil.

5. Bake for 45 minutes.

6. Remove kugel from oven and pour off excess oil.

7. If the kugel is still too watery, bake out some of the moisture before serving.
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— Poached Peach & Chicken Salad
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img code photo … Poached Peach & Chicken Salad

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Ingredients:

… ¾ cup balsamic vinegar
… 2 sprigs fresh thyme
… Kosher salt & ground black pepper
… 2 peaches
(12 oz. total), halved & pitted
… 4½ tsp. olive oil
… 4 cups baby greens

Chicken:

… 1 lb. chicken breasts
… 1 tsp. salt
… 1½ tsp. paprika
… 1⁄8 tsp. garlic powder
… 1⁄8 tsp. onion powder
… 2 tbsp. honey
… 2 tbsp. olive oil
… 2 tsp. cumin
… 2 tsp. rosemary
… salt & pepper

Directions:

1. Prepare a medium gas or charcoal grill fire. (Note: If you don’t have a grill, you can cook the chicken in a sauté pan in its marinade.)

2. Combine vinegar and thyme in a 2-quart saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat.
Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the mixture is thick, syrupy, and reduced to ¼ cup, about 6-9 minutes.

3. Cook peaches in the syrup for 2 minutes until soft. Remove from the heat, discard the thyme sprigs, and season with a pinch of salt and a few grinds of black pepper.

4. Season chicken and grill or sauté in a pan until cooked.

5. In a medium bowl, toss the baby greens with the remaining 2½ tsp. oil and season to taste with salt and pepper. Arrange on a platter.

6. Top with the chicken and peaches. Drizzle with about 2 tbsp. of the reduced balsamic, adding more to taste. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and remaining juice from chicken and peaches.

Tip: Substitute chicken with 1/4 cup feta cheese for a dairy meal.
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— Cabbage Soup with Matzoh Meatballs
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img code photo … Cabbage Soup with Matzoh Meatballs

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Ingredients:

… 1 large onion, diced
… 4 garlic cloves, chopped
… 5 tbsp. canola oil
… 1 tbsp. sugar
… 4 tomatoes, diced
… 1 large green cabbage, chopped
… 8 cups chicken stock
… 1 tbsp. honey
… 2 cups tomato sauce

Matzo Meatballs:

… ½ cup matzo meal
… ½ lb. ground beef
… 3 eggs
… salt and pepper
… 1 tbsp. oregano
… 1 tsp. cumin

Directions:

1. Sauté onion and garlic in canola oil until brown.

2. Add sugar and caramelize.

3. Add remaining ingredients and bring to a boil.

4. Let boil for 30 minutes and then simmer.

5. While the soup is boiling, mix all ingredients for the matzo meatballs.

6. Form into balls, then add the matzo meatballs to the boiling soup. Cook for 20 minutes.
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Try the Award-Winning The No-Potato Passover this year: Leave behind plain potatoes and opt for healthy, delicious and creative food. Find easy-to-make recipes, vibrant travel photography from across the world, original options to create fantastic dishes for Passover and all year-long, and low-carb and gluten-free recipes.
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img code photo … The No-Potato Passover

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Everything you need or want to know about Passover is HERE: Check out OU Kosher’s Passover site for product searches, answers to your FAQs, videos, articles, and more. Also available for free download are the Passover Guide and the Kosher App.

Aviva Kanoff is a personal chef, painter, photographer and mixed media artist. She is a graduate of the French Culinary Institute and has a degree in studio art from Hunter College in NY.
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…..item 3)…. Stress-Relieving Recipes and Tips for an Allergy-Friendly Passover …

ORTHODOX UNION … www.ou.org/life/food

By Tamar Warga | Mar 6th, 2013 |

www.ou.org/life/food/stress-relieving-recipes-tips-allerg…

Passover presents pretty significant challenges for people with nut and egg allergies: Almond-flavored egg white macaroons; egg-laden matzoh balls; hazelnut-filled chocolates; and walnut-laced charoses. It seems like nuts and eggs are in every Passover product and recipe. It’s enough to drive a person with allergies or with kids who have allergies, well, nuts. It can leave you feeling overwhelmed and empty-handed, wondering, Is there anything I can make??

The answer is, of course, yes. Here are a number of tips and recipes to calm your nerves and guide you (almost) effortlessly through the Pesach-cooking process.

1) Relax. Though dealing with allergies can feel especially daunting at this time of year—as if there’s nothing else to stress about—we’re never given more than we can handle. So take a deep breath and say, “I can do this.”

I’m not just spouting platitudes; I speak from experience. Mothering multiples with food allergies (including nuts and eggs) has certainly been challenging, but it has also been inspiring. Rising to the challenge is empowering. Keep your eyes and mind on that light of the end of the tunnel: making a beautiful and safe chag (holiday) for yourself and your family.

2) Get creative. My approach to cooking with food allergies is two-fold: 1) What do I need to stay away from? and 2) What can I substitute for it? If I can’t find a reasonable substitute, I make another recipe that doesn’t call for the allergenic ingredient at all. You can make an eggless potato kugel or you can serve mashed potatoes with sautéed onions and mushrooms. Not every side dish must include eggs (surprise!).

3) Plan ahead. Plan your Pesach from the first Seder (the ceremonial Passover dinner) night to the last day. Keep your kitchen stocked with acceptable foods and freeze the more complicated dishes in advance. Have nut-free charoses (sweet, dark-colored, paste eaten at the Seder) available for the Sedarim, skip the hard-boiled eggs, and go over the menu carefully for sources of nuts and eggs (such as sides and desserts). Instead of a decadent egg- and nut-based cake, serve sorbet and fresh seasonal fruit: Your guests will be delighted to have a sweet, light finish to a heavy meal.

4) Stock up. While Passover is extra challenging with nut and egg allergies, it’s actually a reprieve for people with wheat, soy, and corn allergies. Those who need to avoid these ingredients have a tough time during the year because they are often disguised in many foods as fillers and syrups. Soda typically has corn syrup, but not the Kosher for Passover version. Margarine typically has corn and soy, but not on Passover. Stock up on the corn syrup- free ketchup and gluten- free blintzes while you can!

5) Finally, cook. All my recipes are free of: wheat, dairy, eggs, nuts, fish, corn and soy. They’re simple and flavorful and made with readily available ingredients. The directions are easy to follow so you can get out of the kitchen and enjoy the holiday. The idea is to make things simpler, right?

May you be liberated from Pre-Passover Allergy Anxiety Syndrome: Let’s experience A Taste of Freedom this Pesach.
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— Nut-Free Charoses

… 6 medium apples (peeled, cored, and sliced)

… 1t cinnamon

… 1t sweet red wine

… optional: ¼ cup dates (pitted, checked, and chopped)

Puree all ingredients in a food processor. Consistency should be a coarse puree.

Notes:

If making a traditional walnut version as well, be careful to label the 2 types clearly and to place them in different colored containers to avoid confusion.

Quick and easy kid’s version: applesauce, grape juice, and cinnamon.
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— Sweet Potato With Pineapple

… 5 sweet potatoes (peeled)

… 1 can crushed pineapple

… 3T brown sugar

… touch of cinnamon

Place sweet potatoes in a large pot of water and bring to a boil. Cook for about 45 minutes until potatoes are soft. Drain. Mash Potatoes. Add pineapple and brown sugar.

Place in a baking dish, sprinkle with cinnamon and bake uncovered for 20 minutes at 350.
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— Lace Cookies

… ¾ cup sugar

… 1 ½ cups potato starch

… ½ cup ground, unsweetened coconut

… ⅓ stick margarine

… 2 t of lemon juice (or vanilla extract)

… 2 T water

Preheat oven to 375. Cream margarine and sugar with beater. Add remaining ingredients and combine until smooth.

Drop small balls of mixture onto a cookie sheet (lightly sprayed with baking spray). Cookies will spread, leave room between them. Bake at 375 for 10 minutes. Use the edge of a spatula to separate cookies if they spread into each other. Gently reshape the cookies if necessary while still warm.

Let cookies cool and harden before transferring to an airtight container.
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Tamar Warga, MS-CCC, SLP is a licensed and certified Speech Language Pathologist and a certifiably crazy mother of 10 (4 with food allergies). She is also the author of A Taste of Sweetness for Rosh Hashana Food Allergy E-Cookbook and A Taste of Freedom Passover Food Allergy Cookbook. Tamar blogs at Kosherfoodallergies.blogspot.com, ”where kosher Jews get allergy news.”
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5774 / 2013 — THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 …item 2.. A Sense of History (August 28, 2013 / 22 Elul 5773) …item 3.. Cooking with Honey (Published: August 24, 2013) …
Hot Chicken Recipe

Image by marsmet548
There is something momentous about this historical sense. It reflects the fact – itself one of the great themes of the Bible – that it takes time for human beings to learn, to grow, to rise beyond our often dysfunctional and destructive instincts, to reach moral and spiritual maturity and create a society of dignity and generosity. That is why the covenant is extended over time and why – according to the sages – the only adequate guarantors of the covenant at Mount Sinai were the children yet to be born.
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…..item 1)…. High Holy Days Schedule for 2013 / 5774 …

… Temple Israel of Greater Miami … templeisrael.net/

… About Us
… Home » About Us » High Holy Days Schedule for 2013 / 5774 …

templeisrael.net/about-us/high-holy-days-schedule-for-201…
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— HIGH HOLY DAYS AT TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI

Led by: Rabbi Moshe Thomas Heyn
Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz
Cantorial Soloist Rachel Brook
Dr. Alan Mason
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2013 / 5774 SCHEDULE

—- HIGH HOLY DAY WORKSHOP

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28
7:00-9:00 PM: Led by Rabbis Heyn and Chefitz, this workshop reviews important prayers, rituals and traditions associated with the Days of Awe and offers reflective exercises to heighten your High Holy Day experience.
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— SELICHOT

SATURDAY, AUGUST 31
Reawaken your spirit for the High Holy Days with spiritual leader Rabbi Tom Heyn, Scholar-in-Residence Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz, Cantorial Soloist Rachel Brook, and Director of Music, Dr. Alan Mason, for programs and service that will elevate your soul, bring you closer to the Holy One, and set the tone for renewal for the coming year. Join us for educational programs, a communal Havdallah and dessert reception, and a “Service of Reflection & Forgiveness.” Many see this annual event as the official start of the High Holy Day season.

7:30 PM: Programs for adults, teens and younger children
8:30 PM: Havdalah and Dessert Reception
9:00 PM: Text study with the Rabbis on the process of forgiving and seeking forgiveness; an introduction to the music of Selichot and the High Holy Days with our Director of Music Dr. Alan Mason and Cantorial Soloist Rachel Brook; and maximizing the depth and power of prayer/meditation through breath, an experiential workshop will be taught by certified yoga instructor Michelle Berlin, who was raised in a Jewish family in New Jersey, and travelled to India, Thailand, and Bali to study the intricate relationship between yoga, breath and health.
10:00 PM: "Service of Reflection & Forgiveness" in the Sophie and Nathan Gumenick Chapel
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— Annual High Holy Day Food Drive

From Erev Rosh Hashanah through Yom Kippur, Temple Israel of Greater Miami holds a food drive to benefit Pass It On Ministries of South Florida, a community based, non-profit organization that runs a food pantry and cares for those in need. Temple Israel members and friends are encouraged to donate non-perishable canned or packaged food items. For your convenience, collection boxes will be out during High Holy Day Services. Thank for taking part in this wonderful mitzvah!
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— EREV ROSH HASHANAH

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
6:00 PM: Dinner – Cost members, non-members, for children under 12. RSVP required to Temple office at 305.573.5900 or info@templeisrael.net.
7:30 PM: Rosh Hashanah Evening Service*
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— ROSH HASHANAH MORNING

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5
9:45 AM: Youth Programming – An engaging High Holiday experience is planned for children ages Pre-K though 6th grade, as we assemble and join Rabbi Heyn at 10 a.m. in the Bertha Abess Sanctuary. From there, we will go over to Gumenick Chapel to celebrate with our own service, using a new Children’s High Holiday Prayer Book. The morning will also include planned activities such as games and art projects, the sweet taste of apples and honey, culminating in – as we rejoin the adult service – the majestic sounds of the shofar. Parents, please make your reservations now to the Temple office.
10:00 AM: Rosh Hashanah Morning Service*
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… PRESIDENT’S RECEPTION

12:30 PM: President Joan Schaeffer cordially invites you after services to join her for the Rosh Hashanah President’s Reception in Wolfson Auditorium.
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… TASHLICH

At the conclusion of the President’s Reception, we will walk to the bay to perform Tashlich, symbolically casting our sins into the water.
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… RU’ACH ANNUAL ROSH HASHANAH LUNCHEON

1:30-3:30 PM: Enjoy the company of friends and a delicious buffet catered by Chef Michael Meltzer at the home of Dr. Hope Wine and Mary Prados. Space is limited, so RSVP as soon as possible to Megan Gerstel at the Temple office at mgerstel@templeisrael.net.
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— 2ND DAY ROSH HASHANAH

… FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
10:00 AM: Rosh Hashanah Morning Service in the Gumenick Chapel
SHABBAT SHUVAH

… FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
7:30 PM: Shabbat Service & Oneg

… SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
9:30 AM: Shabbat Service
11:00 AM: Joseph’s Table – Shabbat Shuvah Study
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— CEMETERY MEMORIAL SERVICES

… SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8
10:00 AM: Mt. Nebo (Miami) Cemetery, Richter Mausoleum
11:30 AM: Lakeside Cemetery, Garden of Heroes Mausoleum
12:30 PM: Graceland Cemetery, Gravesite of Cantor Jacob Bornstein
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— KOL NIDRE

… FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
6:00 PM: Dinner – Cost members, non-members, for children under 12. RSVP required to Temple office at 305.573.5900 or info@templeisrael.net.
7:30 PM: Kol Nidre Evening Service
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— YOM KIPPUR

… SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
9:45 AM: Youth Programming – Youth Programming – An engaging High Holiday experience is planned for children ages Pre-K though 6th grade, as we assemble and join Rabbi Heyn at 10 a.m. in the Bertha Abess Sanctuary. From there, we will go over to Gumenick Chapel to conduct our own service, using a new Children’s High Holiday Prayer Book. The morning will also include planned activities, such as games and art projects, with a special Yom Kippur take-away memento to remind us of these meaningful days of forgiveness and renewal. Parents, please make your reservations now to the Temple office.
10:00 AM: Morning Service*

12:30 PM: AAMEN: Alternative AtOneMent Experience in the Now Service – Guided by James A. Weinkle, participants will become attuned to "The Sound of Silence: Listen to the Body Talk," as they bring mind and body together as one.

1:30 PM: Social Justice Program – The Dorothy Serotta Social Justice Forum will address the question of "why our response to gun violence is a moral issue. Guest speakers, the Hon. Cindy Lerner, Mayor of Pinecrest, and former prosecutor Ivan Abrams, Esq., will speak about what can be done to reduce gun violence in our community.

2:30 PM: Creative Service – With the theme of "Caring," this year’s service, coordinated by Elton Kerness, will be in memory of Dr. Fred Witkoff, a long-time participant of the service for which he wrote many poems. Joining Elton in the Creative Service will be Judith Clein, Mark Fried, Doug Jacobs, Alan Mason on piano, Beco Lichtman, Diane Lindner, Phyllis Littman, Vickie Shulman, Bob Waterstone and Bob Waxman.

3:30 PM: Afternoon Service

4:30 PM: Yizkor Memorial Service, followed by Neilah closing service and Sisterhood Break-the-Fast (cost members, non-members, for children under 12. RSVP required to Temple office at 305.573.5900 or info@templeisrael.net).
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— EREV SUKKOT

… WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
Please join us for "Sukkot Under the Stars" – Celebrate Sukkot with food, fun & your TI family!
• 5 p.m.: Teens & kids of all ages welcome to decorate Sukkah
• 6 p.m.: Informal dinner – please bring a favorite dessert! Cost of dinner per person; RSVP to the Temple office at 305.573.5900 or info@templeisrael.net.
• 7 p.m.: Holiday program – prayers, shake the lulav, songs & stories
• 7:45 p.m.: Wine tasting and Rikudim (Israeli dancing)
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— SUKKOT SERVICE & DEDICATION OF NEW PRAYER BOOKS

… FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

6:30 PM: Shabbat "Service of the Heart"

7:30 PM: Shabbat Sukkot Service and Dedication of New Prayer Books. This service will be special, as we dedicate our new prayer books, the hardcover edition of Mishkan T’filah. Please join us as we mark this important symbol of prayer and tradition for present and future generations, and honor our Temple Israel members and friends who made this milestone possible through our Temple Israel Prayer Book Project. Service is followed by a festive Oneg.

… SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

9:30 AM: Shabbat Service

11:00 AM: Joseph’s Table
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— SUKKOT YIZKOR SERVICE

… WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

7:00 PM: Sukkot Yizkor Service, sponsored by the Temple’s Caring Committee. Rabbis Heyn and Chefitz will offer some words and teachings for coping with loss. We encourage anyone who has experienced a loss to attend.
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— SIMCHAT TORAH

… THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
10:00 AM-12:00 PM: Simchat Torah Service in the Gumenick Chapel, followed by Study Session in Kaplan Hall.
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— SIMCHAT TORAH CELEBRATION & CONSECRATION SHABBAT

… FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

7:30 PM: Festive Simchat Torah Celebration and Religious School Consecration Service. At this special service, we welcome our new Religious School students and renew our commitment to the study of Torah and Jewish learning. Consecration takes place around the celebration Simchat Torah, the holiday which celebrates the beginning of a new cycle of Torah reading. The consecration of a new generation of Jews, as they begin their formal Jewish education, coincides with the occasion on which our Torah reading is begun anew. This ceremony has been, throughout the years, a very exceptional and meaningful time for the children and their families, so we hope you will join us. The service is followed by a festive Oneg.
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… SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
9:30 AM: Shabbat Service
11:00 AM: Joseph’s Table
*Childcare is available. Advance reservations required to the Temple office.
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Temple Israel is located at 137 NE 19th St., in Downtown Miami’s Media & Entertainment District.
Reach us at info@templeisrael.net or 305.573.5900. Our website: templeisrael.net.

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…..item 2)…. A Sense of History …

… ORTHODOX UNION … www.ou.org/torah/ … Enhancing Jewish Life …

Aug 28, 2013 / 22 Elul 5773

OU TORAH
Britain’s Chief Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks

www.ou.org/torah/article/a_sense_of_history

Ki Tavo begins with the ceremony of bringing firstfruits to the Temple. The Mishnah (Bikkurim 3) gives a detailed account of what happened:
Those that were near to Jerusalem brought fresh figs and grapes, and those that were far away brought dried figs and raisins. Before them went the ox, its horns overlaid with gold, and with a wreath of olive leaves on its head.
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…. The flute was played before them until they came near Jerusalem. When they were near to Jerusalem, they sent messengers before them and bedecked their first fruits. The rulers and the prefects and the treasurers of the Temple went forth to meet them. According to the honour due to them that came in, they used to go forth. All the craftsmen in Jerusalem used to rise up the for them and greet them, saying, “Brothers, men of such-and-such a place, you are welcome.”

…. The flute was played before them until they reached the Temple Mount. When they reached the Temple Mount, even King Agrippa would take his basket on his shoulder and enter in as far as the Temple Court . .

It was a magnificent ceremony. In historical context, however, its most significant aspect was the declaration each individual had to make:

…. “My father was a wandering Aramean, and he went down into Egypt with a few people and lived there and became a great nation, powerful and numerous . . . Then the Lord brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm, with great terror and with miraculous signs and wonders.” (Deut. 26: 5-10)
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This passage is well-known. It became the text expounded as part of the Haggadah on seder night on Pesach. Its familiarity, though, should not blind us to its revolutionary character. Listening to these words, we are in the presence of one of the greatest revolutions in the history of thought.

The ancients saw the gods in nature, never more so than in thinking about the harvest and all that accompanied it. Nature does not change. Natural time is cyclical – the seasons of the year, the revolution of the planets, the cycle of birth, death and new life. When the ancients thought about the past, it was not the historical but a mythical/metaphysical/cosmological past – the primeval time-before-time when the world was formed out of the struggle between the elements.

That is precisely what did not happen in ancient Israel. It might have been otherwise. Had Judaism been a different kind of religion, the people bringing firstfruits might have recited a song of praise to G-d as the author of creation and sustainer of life. We find several such songs in the Book of Psalms:
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…. Sing to the Lord with thanksgiving;
make music to our God on the harp.
He covers the sky with clouds;
he supplies the earth with rain
and makes grass grow on the hills.
and bread that sustains his heart. (Ps. 147: 7-8)
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The significance of the firstfruits declaration is that it is not about nature but about history: a thumbnail sketch of the sequence of events from the days of the patriarchs to the exodus and then conquest of the land. Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi gave the best analysis of the intellectual transformation this involved:
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…. It was ancient Israel that first assigned a decisive significance to history and thus forged a new world-view . . . Suddenly, as it were, the crucial encounter between man and the divine shifted away from the realm of nature and the cosmos to the plane of history, conceived now in terms of divine challenge and human response . . . Rituals and festivals in ancient Israel are themselves no longer primarily repetitions of mythic archetypes meant to annihilate historical time. Where they evoke the past, it is not the primeval but the historical past, in which the great and critical moments of Israel’s history were fulfilled . . . Only in Israel and nowhere else is the injunction to remember felt as a religious imperative to an entire people. (Zakhor: Jewish History and Jewish Memory, p.8-9)
This history was not academic, the province of scholars or a literary elite. It belonged to everyone. The declarati
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on was recited by everyone. Knowing the story of one’s people was an essential part of citizenship in the community of faith. Not only that, but it was also said in the first person: “My father . . . Then the Lord brought us out of Egypt . . . He brought us to this place”. It is this internalization of history that led the rabbis to say: “In each generation, every person should see himself as if he personally came out of Egypt” (Mishnah Pesachim 10: 5). This is history transformed into memory.

To be a Jew is to be part of a story that extends across forty centuries and almost every land on the face of the earth. As Isaiah Berlin put it:
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…. All Jews who are at all conscious of their identity as Jews are steeped in history. They have longer memories, they are aware of a longer continuity as a community than any other which has survived . . . Whatever other factors may have entered into the unique amalgam which, if not always Jews themselves, at any rate the rest of the world instantly recognizes as the Jewish people, historical consciousness – sense of continuity with the past – is among the most powerful. (Against the Current, p. 252)

Despite Judaism’s emphasis on the individual, it has a distinctive sense of what an individual is. We are not alone. There is no sense in Judaism of the atomic individual – the self in and for itself – we encounter in Western philosophy from Hobbes onwards. Instead, our identity is bound up horizontally with other individuals: our parents, spouse, children, neighbours, members of the community, fellow citizens, fellow Jews. We are also joined vertically to those who came before us, whose story we make our own. To be a Jew is to be a link in the chain of the generations, a character in a drama that began long before we were born and will continue long after our death.

Memory is essential to identity – so Judaism insists. We did not come from nowhere; nor does our story end with us. We are leaves on an ancient tree, chapters in a long and still-being-written story, a letter in the scroll of the book of the people of the Book.

There is something momentous about this historical sense. It reflects the fact – itself one of the great themes of the Bible – that it takes time for human beings to learn, to grow, to rise beyond our often dysfunctional and destructive instincts, to reach moral and spiritual maturity and create a society of dignity and generosity. That is why the covenant is extended over time and why – according to the sages – the only adequate guarantors of the covenant at Mount Sinai were the children yet to be born.

That is as near as we get to immortality on earth: to know that we are the guardians of the hopes of our ancestors, and the trustees of the covenant for the sake of the future. That is what happened in Temple times when people brought their firstfruits to Jerusalem and, instead of celebrating nature, celebrated the history of their people from the days when “My father was a wandering Aramean” to the present. As Moses said in some of his last words to posterity:
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…. Remember the days of old;
consider the generations long past.
Ask your father and he will tell you,
your elders, and they will explain to you. (Deut. 32: 7)
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To be a Jew is to know that the history of our people lives on in us.

To read more writings and teachings from the Chief Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, please visit www.chiefrabbi.org.

Follow OU Torah on Facebook and Twitter!
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…..item 3)…. Cooking with Honey …

… aish.com … www.aish.com/h/hh/r/
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Celebrate the sweet new year in style.

by Elizabeth Kurtz
August 29, 2013 / 23 Elul 5773

www.aish.com/h/hh/r/Cooking-with-Honey.html

Traditionally we eat honey from Rosh Hashanah through Sukkot to symbolize a sweet new year. Apples dipped in honey are of course the most common and easiest version of this custom but I like to use honey in all different ways to bring sweet flavors throughout the meal. Don’t worry, lots of traditional apple and honey cake recipes are coming, but here are a few great ideas and great dishes that will help you celebrate a sweet new year.
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— APPLE AND HONEY CABBAGE SLAW
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Serves 6 – 8

… 1/4 cup mayonnaise, plus 2 tablespoons
… 1/4 cup Tofutti sour cream or sour cream
… 1 tablespoon honey
… 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
… 1/2 teaspoon salt
… 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
… 3 cups shredded green cabbage (about 1/2 head cabbage)
… 2 Granny Smith apples, cored and cut into matchsticks
… 1 large carrot, peeled and shredded
… 1 cup shredded purple cabbage
… 1/2 cup very thinly sliced sweet yellow onion like a Vidalia, Wala Wala or Spanish
… 1/4 cup minced fresh Italian parsley
… Garnish: radicchio leaves, optional

In a bowl, combine the mayonnaise, tofutti sour cream, honey, vinegar, salt, and pepper, and whisk well. Set aside.

In a large bowl, combine green cabbage, apples, carrot, purple cabbage, onion and parsley.

Toss with the dressing until evenly coated. Place in the refrigerator, covered, to chill slightly before serving.

Spoon into radicchio leaves for individual portions.
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— SWEET AND SPICY ORANGE HONEY CHICKEN
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Serves 6 – 8

… 1 cup soy sauce
… 3/4 cup finely chopped yellow onions
… 1/3 cup rice wine vinegar
… 1/4 cup honey
… 3 tablespoons orange juice
… 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
… 2 tablespoons Sriracha (hot red pepper chili paste)
… 2 tablespoons white sesame seeds
… 2 tablespoons chopped fresh gingerroot
… 2 tablespoons minced garlic
… 2 tablespoons sesame oil
… 12 skin-on chicken thighs (about 3 1/2 pounds), and/or 2 chickens cut in 1/8’s

In a large bowl, combine soy sauce, onions, rice wine vinegar, honey, orange juice, cilantro, Sriracha, sesame seeds, ginger, garlic and sesame oil, and stir well to combine.

Place the chicken in a large plastic bag or baking dish and cover with the marinade.

Toss to combine and place in the refrigerator, turning frequently, to marinate at least 6 hours.

Preheat the grill to medium-low or about 325 F or preheat the oven to 350 degress.

Remove the chicken from the marinade, reserving the marinade, and grill the chicken, until brown, about 12-15 minutes. Flip over, and grill an additional 8 – 10 minutes or until cooked through., basting with the marinade while cooking. Alternatively, bake the chicken in the marinade for about 1 hour to 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until chicken is browned and cooked through and the juices run clear. You can also use a grill pan, and grill the chicken on a grill pan.

If you are grilling the chicken, place the leftover marinade in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.

Lower the heat to medium and simmer until slightly thick, about 10-15 minutes.

Arrange the chicken on a platter, and spoon the reduced marinade on top.
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— HONEY BRAISED SHORT RIBS
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Serves 6

… 3 tablespoons olive oil
… 4 – 5 pounds short ribs
… 2 cups celery, small dice
… 1 cup shallots, chopped coarsely
… 5 crushed cloves of garlic
… 1/2 cup of honey
… 1/4 cup of cider vinegar
… 1/2 teaspoon of dry mustard
… 2 tablespoons of ketchup
… 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce (non-fish type)
… 4 cups of beef stock
… Black pepper to taste
… Kosher salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

In a large skillet over high heat, heat oil. When oil is hot, sear the short ribs until well browned on all sides. Reduce flame to low and remove the short ribs to a plate.

Pour out all but two tablespoons of fat remaining in the skillet. Add celery and cook over medium low heat for about 4 minutes.

Add shallots and garlic. Continue cooking over low heat until all the vegetables are nicely translucent and the garlic is soft, about 4 minutes.

Add all the remaining ingredients except for the beef stock and bring up to a boil.

Place short ribs back into the pan along with any juices that have collected. Add enough beef broth to come three quarters of the way up the short ribs. Bring to a boil and then transfer to oven.

Cook for 1 ½ – 2 hours, or until meat is about to fall off the bone.

Serve over mashed potatoes or rice.
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— STRAWBERRY HONEY ORANGE SORBET

Serves 4

… ½ cup apple juice

… 1 pint strawberries, sliced

… ¼ cup orange juice concentrate, frozen

… 2 tablespoons orange liqueur, optional

… 1/3 cup honey

In a blender combine apple juice, strawberries, orange juice, orange liqueur, and honey. Puree until smooth. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions. If you don’t have an ice cream maker, pour puree into a shallow dish and freeze for 1 hour. Remove from freezer and blend again. Refreeze until ready to serve.
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— HONEY CHALLAH

Makes 2 loaves, but can be doubled

… 3 packages rapid rise yeast
… 3½ cups hi-gluten flour
… 1/4 cup warm water
… 3 large eggs
… 1/4 cup vegetable oil
… 1/4 cup honey
… ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
… 1-1/2 teaspoons salt

For the glaze:

… 1 egg, lightly beaten
… 1 teaspoon honey
… ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

In a large bowl, mix the yeast with 1/2 cup of the flour and 1 teaspoon sugar. Add the warm water, stir, and let this mixture, called a sponge, sit until it starts to puff up, 15-to 20-minutes. Add the eggs, oil, honey, and salt; stir until well combined. The sponge will remain lumpy—this is fine. Add the remaining flour and mix the dough in the bowl until all the ingredients are combined. Turn the dough out onto a work surface and knead until fairly smooth, about 2 minutes. The dough should feel very firm and will be hard to knead. If it’s soft and sticky, add more flour until it’s very firm. Transfer the dough to a large, clean container and cover it well. Let it rise until doubled in bulk and very soft to the touch, about 2 hours.

Braid and let rise an additional 1 – 2 hours.

Position an oven rack in the lower third of the oven and heat the oven to 325°F. Make the glaze by whisking with a fork, the egg, honey and vanilla. Just before baking, brush the dough with the glaze. With a thin wooden skewer, poke the bread deeply all over (the holes will prevent air pockets and help the bread keep its shape during baking). Bake for 20 minutes. Rotate the challah 180 degrees and bake until the bread is a dark, burnished brown, about another 15 minutes. (If the challah is browning too rapidly cover it loosely with foil and let it finish baking. Don’t remove the loaf too soon, as you’ll risk underbaking.) Let cool thoroughly on a rack.

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Published: August 24, 2013
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